13
Jan

Sensors in Prosthetics

   Posted by: dhcsoul   in Complex Event Processing

Your first time here? Welcome, I'm glad you've dropped in.... David Soul (aka Bricoleur)

A. J. Perkins writes “Returning amputees from Iraq are getting
computer-driven artifical limbs allowing greater balance and mobility.
These futuristic limbs have hydraulic pumps visible through its clear
plastic shell. They are loaded with an on-board CPU and rechargable
batteries. The Utah3 Arm, which allows simultaneous motion in the
elbow, hand and wrist, offering movement old prosthetics could not.
These are coupled with the SensorSpeedHand, which has electronic
sensors in the fingertips that make it easier to grip objects. The C-Leg monitors motion 50 times per second to assist with balance.”  – goto

originally Posted to cep.weblogger.com by David Soul on 1/12/05; 11:23:35 PM
in the Embedded Systems section.

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Tags: CEP, Complex Event Processing, embedded systems

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