13
Jan

Aircraft the size of Bees

   Posted by: dhcsoul   in Complex Event Processing

“Insects
and birds are as efficient as they could be, so we look at how they are
doing this and try to imitate their flapping mechanisms”

Like
insects and birds, it is just possible that such micro aircraft might
one day even be able to feed themselves. Researchers at the University
of the West of England are creating a new breed of autonomous robot
that will carry out specific tasks and even “feed” themselves while
working.

Insect-sized aircraft could be possible in the future, says
Professor Melhuish, “The biological fuel cell would have to be made
into a soft system which might, in the future, be able to do some sort
of movement at a small level, a small insect level.”

Full story in Science News Daily ….- goto

originally Posted to cep.weblogger.com by David Soul on 12/28/04; 11:48:53 PM
in the Embedded Systems section.


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Tags: CEP, Complex Event Processing, embedded systems, Robot, science

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