15
Nov

Physics in Trouble: Why the Public Should Care

   Posted by: dhcsoul   in Odds & Sods

Your first time here? Welcome, I'm glad you've dropped in.... David Soul (aka Bricoleur)

American theoretical physicist Lee Smolin, author of “The Trouble with Physics,” states that physics has lost its way amid failed experiments and wasted funding. He cites repeated unsuccessful attempts by scientists to develop a “theory of everything,” or a single model to explain the theories of all the fundamental interactions of nature.

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Tags: model, models, physics, science

This entry was posted on Saturday, November 15th, 2008 at 5:33 pm and is filed under Odds & Sods. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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  • November 16, 2008 at 1:38 am David HC Soul
    American theoretical physicist Lee Smolin, author of “The Trouble with Physics,” states that physics has lost its way amid failed experiments and wasted funding. He cites repeated unsuccessful attempts by scientists to develop a “theory of everything,” or a single model to explain the theories of all the fundamental interactions of nature.

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